9 lessons from 9 years of parenting

Boy 1 has just entered his last year of single digits. I never really saw it as a 'thing' when I was younger, but it really has struck me just what a milestone turning 10 is and how much I have learned from my first few years of being a mother. Not just the cliched "time goes so quickly", I know that, but there are few others that stick with me.

  1. Parenting is never easy. From the first day I held Boy1, I realised the enormous responsibility of bringing a human into the world. Every year that passes, there is a new challenge or concern. And the arrival of Boy2 hasn't eased any of it. From lack of sleep, weaning and toilet training to school choices and 'serious conversations', I defy you to find any parent who doesn't walk around with a permanent worry buzzing around the back of their head. We always seem to be longing for a particular phase to pass or arrive, but all we are doing is wishing a new challenge on ourselves whilst wishing away the precious moments we have in the present. Yes, it's hard, but it's a blessing. The moment it becomes 'easy' is probably the moment we stop parenting and have to standby and witness the fruits of our labour. That thought alone fills me with dread and a feeling of loss. I'll stop right there before the tears start 😢
  2. Parenting is confusing, which probably partly explains why it's so hard. So much conflicting advice from friends, family and so-called experts can lead you in different directions. The feeling of only having one chance to make the right decision is horrible – no rehearsals. I like to tell new parents to listen to all of the advice but don't take all of it on. Why follow the advice of someone whose parenting style you don't respect or admire, or whose lifestyle is so far from yours you could never implement their approach? Everyone is confused at some point, just find what works for you and your family, find your own juggling technique, then go with it. As the above mentioned worries and challenges evolve, so will your approach. That's fine.
  3. Kids are expensive. I'm not complaining, just making the point to anyone reading this that hasn't jumped on the baby train yet. It doesn't end after newborn phase. In fact that phase is kinda justifiably expensive as you're investing in big stuff – Cots, buggies, car seats. It's later one when you feel like you're constantly feeding and clothing an ungrateful machine, who's always on school trips and has a social calendar that would put Paris Hilton (circa mid-lay 90's) to shame. Yep, showing my age. But be prepared for the constant haemorrhaging of the cash you once would spontaneously spend on shoes, holidays, or meals in places that didn't serve everything with chips.
  4. Children like simple things. No big party for Boy1, in fact we only do a 'party' on alternate years. Just three of his friends at Total Ninja followed by takeaway pizza and a very small, undecorated Victoria sponge from Tesco. They loved it. Just the simple act of acknowledging his birthday and spending time friends was enough. I think we often over complicate or exaggerate what our children want, need or like, because of our own insecurities, public opinion or the things we missed out on in childhood. Guess what, there's no need.
  5. Happiness is so important, but we can't define it for them. Every child is different. They learn differently, they want different things. Our role is to help them find out what brings them joy. I'm not a total advocate of 'don't worry about your schooling, as long as you're happy', education (not necessarily academic success) is very important. But by opening their eyes to different experiences, we can only hope that they will discover something that sparks real happiness. Because as they get older and more burdened with roles and responsibility, finding a source of joy, something which rests your soul and eases any stresses becomes more difficult. As adults, our own happiness can impact our children. They pick up on everything, even if they don't or won't tell you. Being a parent has really helped me to prioritise the happiness of my family over everyone else's, because that's what's important. Their happiness today will influence their route to happiness in the future.
  6. Friendships are important. Not hundreds of them, not for social media kudos, not for ego polishing, but real relationships. Friendships give children a lot. As well as the obvious happiness and laughter, they teach children about communication, respect, trust, support, conflict, compromise. Childhood friendships can be messy and fickle, but they are so important to our kids. As much as we can try to instil certain things in our children, it's real life situations that help them understand and navigate the world. As adults, our friendships are just as important, not only because children see the way we treat others, but we become more conscious of external influence. I don't want negative energy around my children, so any 'inappropriate' friends are kept away from our home. That's not because they are at risk, of course not, but because sometimes kids just don't get that the 'banterful' or over opinionated friend isn't being serious and I shouldn't have to explain them.
  7. Honesty really is the best policy. Don't get me wrong, I'm not about to sit down with my 2 year old and break down issues such as sexism, racism, homophobia, the list goes on. However, I've realised that kids do listen even when we think they don't. They watch when we think they aren't looking. They have conversations in the playground and eventually on phones and social media, where we aren't privy to what's being said. So it's important to give them an appropriate amount of truth and honesty. If not to avoid confusion and influence from those negative sources, but to build trust in your parental relationship.
  8. There's nothing wrong with living in the moment. It's so easy to get caught up in the day to day routines and rituals. Running from activity to activity, living life through calendar reminders. But there's nothing wrong with throwing caution to the wind and being spontaneous with your kids. They love it. A random decision to bake a cake, watch a film or go splashing in muddy puddles, can bring sunshine to a rainy day. Just having genuine, unstructured fun is great for all of you.
  9. Nothing beats love. The cheesy bit. I realised when I reflected on my mothering experience for The Mothers project, just how overwhelming the feeling of maternal love really is. I slightly recoil when I see #blessed on my news feeds, but in this instance it's totally true. My children make my heart smile and they bring a feeling that I have never and will never feel again. Regardless of anything that's going on in life, this parental love can get you through the most difficult of times. Don't ever, ever forget that. ❤️

Is fear winning? 

God, I hate these posts. Paris, Manchester and now another attack in London. As a parent what do I do? 

I always try to stay positive. I’m factual with my son so as not to shelter him, but when two attacks on home soil happen within less than a month of each other it’s so much harder. 

Everyone says we won’t let fear win. But I’ll be honest, fear is creeping in.

I’m becoming fearful of going to busy events.

I’m becoming fearful of the reaction my oldest will have when I tell him I’m going to London in a couple of days.

I’m becoming fearful of catching the tube, or any crowded transport. 

I’m becoming fearful of other people’s divisive talk and racist rhetoric that’s gradually being allowed into our society. 

I’m becoming fearful of how political powers might respond to this rhetoric and the consequences that might follow. 

I’m becoming fearful of letting go of my son’s hand as he gets older and has to navigate the world alone. 

But regardless of my fears, I have to put a brace face on. I have to appear undefeated, unnerved by recent goings on. Because children cannot operate in a world of fear. They have to operate Ina world of positivity and opportunity. Yes they need to understand the challenges and ‘reality’ of the world, but equally they need to have a mindset that fear does not and will not win. 

So whilst fear seems to have crept into my home quietly, my children need to see me close the door on it. 

Ps – I’d love to hear how you stop fear entering your thoughts 

I’m one of The Mothers!

There isn’t a one size fits all approach to mothering. That fact alone is encouraging.

Anyone in the Manchester area might be aware of a great project by photographer, Bec Lupton, called The Mothers. Its a great collection of photos and reflections on motherhood, from different women. What’s great about it is that it proves just how different everyone’s experiences can be. There isn’t a one size fits all approach to mothering. That fact alone is encouraging.

If you haven’t heard of it, check it out here: http://www.the-mothers.co.uk/

Inspired by some of the articles I’d read and in an attempt to articulate what I really think about my mothering experience, I decided to get involved.

The verdict? I loved it! It was almost therapeutic to take the time and really think about motherhood from my own perspective. Expectations vs reality. Good advice vs bad advice. Hopes and aspirations.

Plus I got some great action shots of me and the boys – it was a nightmare getting them to both sit still at the same time without resorting to Paw Patrol (!)

With parenting life being soooo busy, its easy to lose perspective and forget what its all about. I’d highly recommend taking a few minutes out to think about what you want for your family. And if you fancy it, get in touch with Bec and take part in this fab project – I’d love to hear your thoughts!

xx

PS – she’s also started The Fathers, for any dads who’d like to share

 

Top tips for train journeys with a toddler

So yesterday Boy2 and I ventured into London for the day. I’d arranged to meet my old uni pals so thought it would be nice for him to see them again and a great opportunity for Boy1 to have a day with daddy (one on one time is so important when you have children).

So off we went on the 0936 from Manchester. It’s been a few years since I ventured on a train with a toddler but I managed to remember a few important things….

  1. Advance Planning – book your train ticket in advance. Not only does it save save £££, but it increases your chances of being able to reserve a decent seat. Extra tip – if you select a seat with a table and near a toilet, you are more likely to get one close to the disabled area (coach C is a good bet) then you are likely to have space to park a buggy. 
  2. Timing – think about the time of your train. Avoid really busy times and work around meal/nap times. Do you really want to be stuck on a rammed train with a screaming, hungry toddler? I split his breakfast into two parts. Porridge before we left home then some toast on the train (which also kept him occupied) 
  3. Snacks – very very important for distracting little ones. Whilst 2 hours doesn’t seem too long, it can feel like an eternity with a bored little one. So plenty of rice cakes, fruit slices, raisins etc but I’d avoid spillable things like yogurt. 
  4. Entertainment – again, more distractions. Depending on the age of your little one, an iPad and headphones might do the trick (remember to download in advance!) in fact Virgin trains have just launched its Beam app which is great for accessing kids shows like Peppa Pig. But you’ll need to download the app before your train leaves. Books to read (thin ones) and colouring books are also a good idea. 
  5. Pack light – yes, with all the food and entertainment. It’s more about packing smart. Can you pack everything into one bag, or try to squeeze a bag into the buggy basket. Basically, you don’t want a massive bag hanging off your shoulders or handle bars. Rucksacks are quite a good idea to be honest
  6. Energy management – so you’ve arrived at your destination, but your child has been strapped in a buggy or pinned down to his seat for the past three hours. Try to find some time and space to let them stretch their legs and burn some energy. Make sure they also do this towards the end of your day. This is particularly important for your journey home. In an ideal world they’ll sleep on the train. 
  7. Meals – yep, talking about food again. But search for child-friendly places to eat in advance so you don’t have to pack to many meals, you aren’t wandering the streets at the last minute with a starving child and, most importantly, you know they’ll eat. 
  8. Sleep – try to aim for a return journey where little one will be ready to sleep, or at least winding down. We opted for the 64o. Once we were on the train, it was time for dinner (Ella’s kitchen obvs) a few books and a nappy change them he was clearly tired. I think the tiredness was down to letting him run riot in M&S for half an hour before a half hour walk to Euston a la point 6. So once he was in the buggy, he spent about 15 minutes mesmerised by passing trees, then fell asleep. 

Travelling alone with a little one can be daunting but also lots of fun. If you haven’t dared do it yet, I’d encourage you to give it a go. Nothing ventured, nothing gained! 

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